Are you being bitten?

Posted in Blog on 6th March 2018

Despite the term, ‘mosquito bite’, mosquitoes don’t actually open their ravenous jaws to have a nibble on your ankles; it is the proboscis (the long pointed mouthpart) that pierces the skin with its razor sharp end, to get to the delicious blood supply beneath.  The proboscis has two tubes, one to withdraw the blood and another to deposit saliva. The way in which we react to mozzie bites is dependent on this saliva and the reaction our body has to the proteins it contains.

Reactions to mosquito bites vary enormously; from mild irritation to potentially life threatening, with a contingent of people not reacting at all to them. This is where many people fall fowl of a common misconception; just because you cannot see or feel bites, does not mean you have not been bitten! This is ok in the UK, but as soon as these people leave the sanctuary of British shores they are even more at risk than the normal population, whose bites itch like crazy.

In 2010, nations sweetheart Cheryl Cole contracted malaria whilst hiking in Tanzania just one year after her sport relief Kilimanjaro Climb, ironically in a bid to raise money to combat the illness! Upon boarding the plane to return to the US, Cole notes that she discovered just THREE small bites on her body, and within days was rushed to hospital – rushed from the X-Factor set.

Cheryl Cole

 

It is common for those who have think they are ‘safe’ because they do not react to insect bites, and therefore assume they are not being bitten, and in turn take less precaution in higher-risk areas. Remember, just because you cannot see the bite, does not mean its not there. If you are not sure if you’re being bitten and going anywhere in the Tropics it is advisable that you take incognito® insect repellent: it is better to be safe than sorry.

 

Currently mosquitoes and other insects are at record levels all over the world including the UK; this is because this mild winter did not kill off that many of the numbers and the remaining bugs have had less competition. Also, the wet and warm weather we are now experiencing is ideal for breeding insects. So if you do react to bites it’s better to learn to protect yourself now, before it gets worse. Click here for protection info: http://www.lessmosquito.com//avoiding_insect_bites_s/1829.htm

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